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Confining sliders to part of a range

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Andrew B.

Posts: 200
Filters: 2
I might be overlooking something that has changed. Or maybe I never really understood it. What I thought was a slider cannot have it's total range limited. IOW, lets say I have an effect that can take an image all the way from black to white. But I want my slider to only take it from dark gray to light gray. My understanding is I can't confine the slider to this range, and that remapping only changes the range of numbers on a slider, not the range of real values it can cover.

Am I wrong?
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Carl
c r v a

Posts: 7163
Filters: 75
Yes you can limit ......... throw on an example where it's not working for you smile:)
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Andrew B.

Posts: 200
Filters: 2
The reason it's not working for me is I thought it could not be done. And so I was only using remapping to reverse the direction of the sliders. But after reading your message now, I went in and tried it. I was confused at first, but I set up a very clear test and I think I understand it now.

So next I have to figure out why I'm using an IntSlider to adjust blur, blend opacity, gamma, etc. Is there really a good reason? I have a vague memory of it being more flexible. But now I can't see the advantage.
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Carl
c r v a

Posts: 7163
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intslider do steps smile:)
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Morgantao
Can't script

Posts: 2185
Filters: 20
There are some components that use fractions of a number to control the output. Others use whole numbers only.
An IntSlider gives you whole numbers only, like 1, 2, 3, 4...
A Slider gives you any number, like 1, 2.1, 0.25, 1.14...

If you are using a switch component, you need an IntSlider, because there's no half state in the switch (There's 1 or 2, not 1.6).
If you use an offset component, the value goes between 0 and 1. That means 0.25 is a 25% movement to the right, 0.5 is the middle, and 1 is 100% movement, meaning you're back where you were. For that you need a regular slider, that can have values anywhere between 0 and 1, not just whole numbers.
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Andrew B.

Posts: 200
Filters: 2
Thanks, Morgantao. That helps me get started. I think I'm going create a simple filter and compare the sliders. Then, maybe I'll understand it even better.

One thing I did notice about regular slider, I can't change the maximum value. Changing it increases the number of steps between lowest and highest numbers, allowing greater fine tuning of effects. OTOH, I wonder if this really matters once I limit the range. With a limited range, I think the number of steps increase to fill that range. But I'll have to check this.

One thing I'm not happy about: if I change all this I'm going to have to translate my presets. But I'll wait and see how this goes.
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Ghislaine
Ghislaine

Posts: 1690
Filters: 108
Quote
I think I'm going create a simple filter and compare the sliders. Then, maybe I'll understand it even better.


Andrew, yes for sure. And go ahead ! the best way to learn, it is to try components and settings on. smile:)
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Morgantao
Can't script

Posts: 2185
Filters: 20
Quote
Andrew B. wrote:I wonder if this really matters once I limit the range.


Yes, it matters, because it lets the user fine tune the settings.
Let's say you have a blur node. Suppose you only want the blur to be any value between 1.00 and 2.00. Any less and it won't blur enough, any more and it will blur too much.
If you put a slider and control on the blur, you need to limit the range to [min 1.00] and [max 2.00].
Now let's say your slider has a [max value] of 4. That will give the user the option to have a blur of <1.00> or <1.25> or <1.50> or <1.75> or <2.00>. That means 4 steps, or levels of blur.
OTOH suppose your slider has max value of 100. Now the user has a VERY fine control over the blur: <1.00>, <1.01>, <1.02>, <1.03>....<1.98>, <1.99>, <2.00>.
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Andrew B.

Posts: 200
Filters: 2
This is proving more problematic than I thought. What happens is I limit the range. Then I end up with a slider that covers that limited range, but not every step of the slider has an effect on the photo. And it seemed like I would have to do too many tests to figure out that magic ration to get this to work right.

Then I noticed another filter that uses the the same basic method as mine. And it has a limited slider. So I checked it. And the problem is there too. So it's not just a mistake I'm making. One can move the slider several steps, and nothing happens. Push it further, and finally something does happen. A few more steps and nothing.

I realize it's easier on users to have a slider limited. But having a slider do nothing drives me nuts. Maybe I notice this more because I'm into using the arrow keys to fine tune things.

There has got to be a magic ratio that would allow me to limit the range and also make sure each step makes a real difference. But it seems like it would take too much testing to discover this. OTOH, my brain doesn't work as well as it used to. So I'm not sure I would even understand this.
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